Planting a flag in the desert, Heaton declared the area, known to locals as Bir Tawil, the Kingdom of North Sudan. Heaton fancies himself the king and his daughter the princess. Now the story is getting the Disney treatment . The international conglomerate has purchased the rights to Heatons story with the plan of making a movie. The Princess of North Sudanwill show fans of fairy tales what happens when a dad just cant say no. The studio is focusing on the relationship between the father and daughter set against a backdrop of a fantastical adventure, reports The Hollywood Reporter. The film has been crowdfunding in the works since last November, but with the Mickey Mouse company announcing Stephany Folsom as the screenwriter on Wednesday, reminding the world of the films plot line and inspiration, angry social media users unleashed their disdain. As critics felt the film and Heaton’s actions contribute to the centuries-long history of white people exploiting Africa which continues today Folsom defended the film on Twitter in a series of since-deleted tweets. One, captured by Entertainment Weekly, read, There is no planting a flag in Sudan or making a white girl the princess of an African country. Thats gross. Folsoms representatives did not immediately respond to TakeParts request for comment. Even if thats not the story Folsom plans to tell, the one she bases it on brings to mind Disneys long history of, well, Disneyfication of history. Like omitting the bit about how Pocahontas was kidnapped, raped, and forced into marriage in the companys 1995 film, instead turning the Native Americans life into a love story with a happy ending. Heaton negotiated the rights to his story with Disney, Newsweek reports ; his payment has not been disclosed.

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Challenging Ideas On Practical Crowdfunding Programs

As Cascio observed, that observation “was arrogant at the time, but now we are getting the capacity to make the world in ways that previously was reserved to the deity. What we haven’t been developing as swiftly is the wisdom to know what to make and what not to make. And that will be one of our primary challenges in the next couple of decades.” To Cascio, this dramatic shift in industrial manufacturing is more about anthropology and cultural change than about economics. “It is a moment of transformation between an older and a newer system.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/04/makerspaces-are-remaking-local-economies/390807/#disqus_thread

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